New Singapore apartment complex latest to feature daring sky-high swimming pool

February 10 2016

Five terrifying pools from around the world

Are you scared of heights? You might struggle with these.

It seems architects are outdoing each other to provide the most spectacular, jaw-dropping swimming experience for apartment residents.

First we had the amazing rooftop infinity pool at the Marina Bay Sands development in Singapore designed by renowned Canadian architect Moshe Safdie. This building has the world's largest public cantilevered platform – 194 metres above the ground. And the most amazing feature of the platform is the 150 metre-long pool where the water appears suspended in the air.

Then there is the Embassy Gardens project in London by the Ballymore Group, which will feature a glass-bottom pool suspended 35 metres above a laneway. The developers of this project say it will feel like "floating through the air in central London".

Suspended between two towers 100 metres above the ground, the pool at the new Sky Habitat development comes with a great view.
Suspended between two towers 100 metres above the ground, the pool at the new Sky Habitat development comes with a great view.

And now Moshe Safdie is behind a new Singapore project with a sky-high pool "bridge".

The Sky Habitat towers are designed on the vertical village concept.

The Sky Habitat towers are designed on the vertical village concept.

Domain reports that the pool at Safdie's latest residential project, Sky Habitat, is sure to get the adrenalin pumping – it's suspended between two 38-storey apartment towers 100 metres above the ground.

The 509-unit complex, which was completed last year, also provides a second pool for those who may be overwhelmed at the prospect of a swim in the sky. This one is firmly embedded in the ground below.

From a distance Sky Habitat appears as two pixilated, stumpy triangle forms with protruding garden balconies. The complex epitomises the new vertical village concept that is encouraging residents to embrace a more communal-style living.

Sustainability was a key consideration in the design – the units are laid out to ensure a good air flow to offset the tropical humidity that's usually around 80 per cent.
The infinity pool at the top of the Marina Bay Sands development is not for the faint-hearted.

The infinity pool at the top of the Marina Bay Sands development is not for the faint-hearted.

 

The Singapore project is considered a nod to Safdie's first major work as a young architect, when he designed Habitat 67.

This project was an experimental community housing complex in Montreal, comprising 354 pre-fabricated concrete "blocks" stacked up on one another.

It's an arrangement that is echoed in the last year's World Architecture Festival winner – the Interlace in Singapore. That project, designed by architect Ole Scheeren and OMA, features 31 six-storey apartment blocks stacked in groups of four.

Scheeren brought the concept of "community" to the forefront of his design by creating a complex that accommodates 1000 apartments while maximising shared spaces.

A glass-bottomed pool is a key feature of the Embassy Gardens project in London.
A glass-bottomed pool is a key feature of the Embassy Gardens project in London.

 

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