The World’s Coolest Public Swimming Pool Will Be in Copenhagen’s Harbor

Water Culture House in Copenhagen

No matter where you are in Denmark, you’re never more than 30 miles from the sea.

Seaside life is an important part of Danish culture — and something that architects will hope revitalize a disused artificial island in Copenhagen’s harbor.

Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma & Associates recently won a competition to build Copenhagen’s new Waterfront Culture Center, paying homage to the Danish seaside culture.

Visitors to the center will be able to swim in indoor/outdoor pools that terrace down directly to the sea while elevated glass pools will allow visitors to swim through brick pyramids. The mock-ups are a fantastic, almost futuristic look into the elegant potential for public swimming pools. The building will also include spaces for sports and wellness activities.

Water Culture House in Copenhagen

Courtesy of KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES, INC.

Water Culture House in Copenhagen

Courtesy of KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES, INC.

“Our focus in design is to create an experience, and not just a standalone object, in the form of the landscape, art and architecture that are unified and defined by the water,” the project's lead architect Yuki Ikeguchi, said in a statement. “Our design attempts to soften and dissolve the edge and blur the sense of boundary of the land.”

Water Culture House in Copenhagen

Courtesy of KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES, INC.

Water Culture House in Copenhagen

Courtesy of KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES, INC.

The architects have not released an expected date of completion for the project.

The project is part of a redevelopment to turn an disused artificial island into a center of culture as Copenhagen expands and revitalizes its waterfront. Christiansholm (known locally as Paper Island) used to be the home of the Danish press. Today, it is a public center where visitors wander through former industrial warehouses that now house street food stalls, event space and an experimental science and technology museum.

Tnis article was originally written by Cailey Rizzo and appeared here.

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